Posted on Leave a comment

Help Prevent Falls In Construction

In construction, falls have been the leading cause of workplace fatalities for many years. According to BLS data, 395 workers lost their lives due to falls in 2022. Falls are preventable. The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries. This year the event will be held May 6-19, 2024.

A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a Stand-Down by taking a break to focus on fall hazards and reinforcing the importance of fall prevention. Anyone who wants to prevent hazards in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down.

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort:

  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
  • National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)
  • OSHA-approved State Plans
  • State consultation programs
  • Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR)
  • American Society of Safety Professionals (ASSP)
  • National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE)
  • U.S. Air Force
  • OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers

Companies have many options for conducting a Safety Stand-Down, for example, taking a break to have a toolbox talk. Other safety activities include conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job-specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a Stand-Down that works best for their workplace. OSHA’s website hosts an Events page to help employers and employees find events in your area. Additionally, OSHA offers suggestions to prepare for a successful “Stand-Down” and highlights from past “Stand-Downs.”

At NSC we offer a Fall Protection Training Course that has everything you need to equip employees to be safe at work and prevent falls. Our Fall Protection Bundle is an all-in-one resource for fall prevention and awareness in the workplace. It includes our Fall Protection Training and Booklets, which can inform your employees on the existence and use of industry-regulated fall prevention systems. We will also include our Fall Protection Standards & Regulations Manual, an easy-to-read resource on federal fall prevention regulations.

Posted on Leave a comment

Working to Make Work Zones Safer for Everyone

Work Zone

National Work Zone Awareness Week (NWZAW) is an annual spring campaign held at the start of construction season to encourage safe driving through highway work zones. The key message is for drivers to use extra caution in work zones. An event that started with a local campaign in Bristol, Virginia to raise awareness for work zone safety has grown into an annual national event for 24 years. This year it is hosted by the Maryland Department of Transportation, April 15-19.

In 1999 VDOT (Virginia Department of Transportation), the Federal Highway Administration, and the American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials began working in collaboration to launch the first NWZAW in 2000. Together they outlined goals for the campaign.

National Work Zone Awareness Week Goals:

  • Initiate efforts to raise awareness of the need for more caution when driving through work zones to decrease fatalities and injuries;
  • Establish and promote a uniform set of safety tips;
  • The value of training and importance of best practices in regard to work zone safety would be promoted among individuals in the private sector, industry, and roadway workers;
  • Reach out to both roadway workers and contractors to communicate possible effects of motorists’ behavior in response to traffic delays, and advise on what steps might possibly be taken to lessen negative behavior; and
  • Outreach efforts would be made to work with entities involved with work zone safety and to form partnerships.

The initial national kickoff event was held in Springfield, Virginia. Every other year, the kickoff event is hosted in the Washington, D.C. area and in the alternate years it travels to cities around the country. In 2004, NWZAW’s fifth year, the executive committee decided to incorporate a theme with the event to better promote work zone safety. The first theme was, “The Worker’s Office Is the Roadway.” This year the theme is, “Work Zones are temporary. Actions behind the wheel can last forever.”

In 2016 National Go Orange Day was introduced as a new element of NWZAW. Individuals and organizations are encouraged to wear orange to show support for work zone safety. Posting to social media using #Orange4Safety and # NWZAW is another way to to spread the message.

Thankfully, National Work Zone Awareness Week (NWZAW) has been successful in spreading awareness for work zone safety across the country. It is easy to get involved and help bring awareness to this responsibility we all share. It is everyone’s duty to be alert, obey the signs, and keep workers and other drivers safe in work zones.

Nationwide events include:

  • Work Zone Safety Training Day – April 15
  • National kickoff event – April 16
  • Go Orange Day – April 17
  • Social media storm – April 18
  • Moment of Silence – April 19. The moment of silence was started in 2022 to remember the men and women whose lives were lost in a work zone incident.

Posted on Leave a comment

OSHA is Switching From Traditional Hard Hats to Safety Helmets

OSHA announces switch from traditional hard hats to safety helmets. The goal is to better protect agency employees from head injuries.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced that the agency is replacing traditional hard hats used by its employees with more modern safety helmets to protect them better when they are on inspection sites.

In 2020, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports head injuries accounted for nearly 6 percent of non-fatal occupational injuries involving days away from work. Almost half of those injuries occurred when workers were struck by an object or equipment and about 20 percent were caused by slips, trips and falls.

Traditional Hard Hats Need an Upgrade

Dating back to the 1960s, traditional hard hats protect the top of a worker’s head but have minimal side impact protection and do not have chin straps. Without the straps, traditional hard hats can easily fall off a worker’s head if they slip or trip, leaving them unprotected. In addition, traditional hard hats lack vents and trap heat inside.

Along with this announcement, OSHA published a Safety and Health Information Bulletin detailing key differences between traditional hard hats and more modern safety helmets. The bulletin highlights advancements in design, materials, and other features that help protect workers’ entire heads better. Additionally, today’s safety helmets may also offer face shields or goggles to protect against projectiles, dust, and chemical splashes. In fact, some more advanced helmets even offer built-in hearing protection and/or communication systems to enable clear communication in noisy environments.

The agency recommends safety helmets be used by people working in the construction industry and the oil and gas industry; in high-temperature, specialized work and low-risk environments; performing tasks involving electrical work and working from heights; and when required by regulations or industry standards.

Recommended Uses for Safety Helmets Instead of Hard Hats

  • Construction Sites: Especially those with high risks of falling objects and debris, impacts from equipment, or slips, trips, and falls.
  • Oil and Gas Industry: In these sectors where workers face multiple hazards, including potential exposure to chemicals and severe impacts.
  • Working from Heights: For tasks or jobs that involve working from heights.
  • Electrical Work: For tasks involving electrical work or proximity to electrical hazards.
  • High-Temperature Environments: In high temperatures or where there is exposure to molten materials.
  • Specialized Work Environments: Jobs that require integrated face shields, hearing protection or communication devices benefit from safety helmets designed with these features or the ability to add them on.
  • Specific Regulatory Requirements: Where safety helmets are mandated by regulations or industry standards, employers must comply with these requirements to ensure worker safety compliance.
  • Low-Risk Environments: Even in settings with no overhead hazards, safety helmets provide comprehensive protection.

In OSHA’s Safety and Health Information Bulletin they present the key differences between safety helmets and traditional hard hats. Including the advancements in design, materials, and protective features that help to protect the worker’s entire head. As well as providing instructions for properly inspecting and storing both safety helmets and traditional hard hats.

Properly storing head protection is crucial to maintain its structural integrity and to prevent damage. It is important to inspect head protection before each use. This will identify signs of wear, damage, or expiration. Always refer to the manufacturer’s guidelines for care, use, and storage.

Recommendations on How to Properly Care for Head Protection:

  • Clean and dry head protection before storing.
  • Inspect shell and suspension system for cracks, dents, or other signs of damage. Examine the headband and chin strap for wear and tear ensuring it is free from any signs of damage.
  • Check for labels and certification marks. Make sure that the labels are legible and not tampered with.
  • Verify date of manufacture and refer to the manufacturer’s guidelines for the recommended lifespan of your specific head protection model.
  • Examine accessories and attachments. If your head protection has additional accessories or attachments inspect them for damage or signs of wear. Make sure they are securely fastened to the head protection and functioning correctly.
  • Check for proper fit. Adjust the suspension system to achieve a snug fit without excessive pressure points. Head protection should not be too loose or too tight.
  • Evaluate for damaged or loose parts by gently shaking your head (with the head gear on) to check for any loose or rattling components.
  • Inspect interior cushioning for wear or compression. If it shows signs of deterioration, contact the manufacturer for replacement options.
  • Assess previous impact damage. If your head protection has experienced an impact or has been subjected to a significant force, retire it immediately. Head protection is designed for single-use impact protection and may not retain its full effectiveness after an incident.
  • Keep records: Maintain a record of each inspection, noting the date, any findings, and actions taken. Regularly document the date of purchase and any relevant information about the head protection to track its lifespan accurately.

At National Safety Compliance we offer everything you need for safety training compliance. A thorough understanding of both types of head protection options allows employers and workers to make informed decisions on which type to use. OSHA wants employers to make safety and health a core value in their workplaces and is committed to doing the same by leading by example and embracing the evolution of head protection.

Posted on Leave a comment

OSHA’s 2023 Top 10 Released

During the 2023 NSC Safety Congress & Expo in New Orleans, Eric Harbin, OSHA’s Region 6 administrator, announced for the 13th consecutive fiscal year, Fall Protection – General Requirements is OSHA’s most frequently cited standard. Fall Protection was followed by Hazard Communication and Ladders.

As a whole, the Top 10 cited standards remain unaltered from 2022. While the number one spot remains firmly in place, the other spots saw some shifting this year. Notably, Powered Industrial Trucks moved into the top five and Respiratory Protection, which had previously been fourth, fell to seventh.

Top 10 Most Cited Standards for 2023

  1. Fall Protection – General Requirements (1926.501): 7,271 violations
  2. Hazard Communication (1910.1200): 3,213
  3. Ladders (1926.1053): 2,978
  4. Scaffolding (1926.451): 2,859
  5. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178): 2,561
  6. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147): 2,554
  7. Respiratory Protection (1910.134): 2,481
  8. Fall Protection – Training Requirements (1926.503): 2,112
  9. Personal Protective and Lifesaving Equipment – Eye and Face Protection (1926.102): 2,074
  10. Machine Guarding (1910.212): 1,644

While progress is constantly being made to keep workers safe there continues to be the same type of citations year after year. Understanding these violations and the associated risks is essential for preventing accidents and creating safer workplaces. Lorraine M. Martin, NSC President and CEO, challenged industry leaders at the 2023 NSC Safety Congress & Expo, “As a safety community, we must come together to acknowledge these persistent trends and identify solutions to better protect workers.” Paying attention to this list of violations can highlight areas that workplaces can improve safety and prevent future accidents. These are key areas in need of improvement.

Interestingly, the overall quantity of violations for the top 10 increased in 2023. Since OSHA’s out there and busier than ever employers and employees need to focus on making safety a top priority. All companies should seek to prevent worker injuries and as a bonus avoid OSHA fines. Whatever the safety training need, at National Safety Compliance we offer training for all of your staff from industrial worksites to office personnel with our easy and comprehensive training programs.

Posted on Leave a comment

Beat the Heat with “Water.Rest.Shade.”

Every day, millions of U.S. workers are exposed to heat in their workplaces. Although illness from exposure to heat is preventable, every year, thousands become sick from occupational heat exposure. Sadly, some cases are fatal. Hazardous heat exposure can occur indoors or outdoors. As a result, OSHA is sponsoring a “Beat the Heat Contest” to raise awareness of the dangers and hazards of heat exposure in both indoor and outdoor workplaces.

OSHA’s Beat the Heat Contest has four main goals:

  1. Educate stakeholders, especially workers and employers, about heat hazards in the workplace.
  2. Prevent heat illness by creating an awareness campaign that increases the public’s knowledge about this issue.
  3. Highlight the dangers of heat; and
  4. Motivate employers and workers to take action to prevent heat illness.

Tragically, every year, dozens of workers die and thousands more become ill while working in hot or humid conditions. To combat this, OSHA created a Heat Illness Prevention campaign in 2022 to educate employers and workers on the dangers of working in the heat. Whether you work outside, or inside in a hot and humid environment, you’re at risk of enduring a heat illness. “Our goal is to make it safe for workers in hot indoor and outdoor environments, so that they can return home safe and healthy at the end of each day,” said Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Doug Parker. “Working together, we can ensure workers know their rights and employers meet their obligations in order to protect workers from the growing dangers of extreme heat.”

Some industries where workers have suffered heat-related illnesses:

  • Agriculture         
  • Bakeries, kitchens, and laundries
  • Construction – especially, road, roofing, and other outdoor work
  • Electrical utilities, boiler rooms  
  • Fire Service
  • Landscaping       
  • Iron and steel mills and foundries
  • Mail and package delivery           
  • Manufacturing
  • Oil and gas well operations          
  • Warehousing

What are heat illnesses? A heat illness is one caused by high temperatures and humidity. In a warm environment, the human body relies on its ability to get rid of excess heat to maintain a healthy internal body temperature. Heat dissipation happens naturally through sweating and increased blood flow to the skin. If heat dissipation does not happen quickly enough, the internal body temperature keeps rising and the worker may experience symptoms that include thirst, irritability, a rash, cramping, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke.

The four most common heat illnesses include:

  • Heat rash, which is a stinging skin irritation that turns your skin red.
  • Heat cramps, which are painful spasms in your muscles.
  • Heat exhaustion, which is caused by too few fluids and long hours in high temperatures, causes heavy sweating, a fast and weak pulse and rapid breathing.
  • Heat stroke happens when your temperatures rise above 106 degrees very quickly -within minutes. This is a life-threatening illness.

Heat illness is serious, but we can work together to prevent it.

Employer’s Responsibility

Employers can keep workers safe in the heat. Employers should create plans to protect workers from developing heat-related illnesses. Keeping workers cool and well-hydrated are the best ways to protect them when working in hot environments. If you or your employees are working in a hot work environment, it is vital to understand how to address heat-related illnesses to keep everyone safe.

Heat-related illnesses can be prevented. The first step in prevention is for employers and workers to recognize heat hazards. Management should commit to:

  • Protect new workers.
  • Train all employees to recognize heat hazards.
  • Determine whether total heat stress is too high.
  • Implement engineering and administrative controls to reduce heat stress.
  • Provide sufficient rest, shade, and fluids.

Unfortunately, most outdoor fatalities occur in the first few days of working in warm or hot environments because the body needs to build a tolerance (acclimatization) to the heat gradually over time. Lack of acclimatization is a major risk factor for fatal outcomes. Our bodies sweat to cool ourselves. Sometimes, sweating isn’t effective enough.

In fact, OSHA encourages water, rest, & shade as prevention as well as treatment for heat-related illness. In addition, engineering controls such as air conditioning, can make the workplace safer. Other options include making changes to workload and schedules. For example, scheduling work for the morning or shorter shifts with frequent rest breaks in the shade. Encourage workers in warm, humid environments to drink hydrating fluids. At a minimum, all supervisors and workers should receive training about heat-related symptoms and first aid. The best scenario in workplaces at high risk of heat illnesses would be a formal Heat Illness Prevention Program.

Heat Illness Prevention Program key elements include:

  • A Person Designated to Oversee the Heat Illness Prevention Program
  • Hazard Identification
  • Water. Rest. Shade. Message
  • Acclimatization
  • Modified Work Schedules
  • Training
  • Monitoring for Signs and Symptoms
  • Emergency Planning and Response

Worker Information

It is important to understand workers’ rights and vital information about heat illness. Clearly, some workers are more susceptible to heat-related illness. Personal risk factors include medical conditions, lack of physical fitness, previous episodes of heat-related illness, alcohol consumption, drugs, and use of certain medication. Management should commit to preventing heat-related illness for all employees. In accordance with their heat tolerance levels. Measurement of heart rate, body weight, or body temperature can provide individualized data to aid decisions about heat controls.

Training workers before work in extreme heat begins is just the first step in keeping workers safe. Additionally, tailoring the training to worksite conditions is key. Employers should provide a heat stress training program for all workers and supervisors that include the following:

  • Causes of heat-related illnesses and steps to reduce the risk.
  • The importance of acclimatization.
  • Recognition of the signs and symptoms of heat-related illnesses and administra­tion of first aid.
  • The importance of immediately reporting any symptoms or signs of heat-related illness.
  • Proper care and use of heat-protective clothing and equipment.
  • The added heat load caused by exertion, clothing, and per­sonal protective equipment.
  • Effects of other factors (drugs, alcohol, obesity, etc.) on tolerance to occupational heat stress.
  • Procedures for responding to symptoms of possible heat-related illness.
  • Procedures for contacting emergency medical ser­vices.

While heat related illnesses are dangerous, they are also preventable with the right knowledge and plan in place. Employees can be prepared and protected while working in less than perfect environments. At NSC, we are here to help. Our Heat Stress Training Program encourages employees to have a positive attitude about heat fatigue safety, learn the symptoms of heat exhaustion and how to recognize if their body is overheating to prevent heat fatigue.

Posted on Leave a comment

Renewed Focus on Enforcement

In recent years, the Department of Labor, DOL for short, has renewed its commitment to enforce labor laws, promoting the safety and health of American workers. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, OSHA for short, was created in 1970 to ensure safe and healthy conditions for all workers. It is OSHA’s responsibility to set and enforce safety standards that employers must comply with in order to provide employees with the safest workplace possible. Just last month, OSHA issued two memorandums indicating that they are stepping up their focus on the enforcement of labor laws. In Fact, both memorandums were issued by OSHA’s Directorate for Enforcement Programs. 

According to the DOL, OSHA “has issued new enforcement guidance to make its penalties more effective in stopping employers from repeatedly exposing workers to life-threatening hazards or failing to comply with certain workplace safety and health requirements.”

The first memorandum, Application of Instance-by-Instance Penalty Adjustment, gives OSHA Regional Administrators and Area Office Directors the authority to cite certain types of violations as “instance-by-instance citations.” This includes cases where the agency identifies “high-gravity” serious violations of OSHA standards specific to certain conditions. Specifically when the language of the rule supports a citation for each instance of non-compliance. The purpose of this change is to encourage OSHA personnel to apply the full authority of the Occupational Safety and Health Act where increased citations will in fact discourage non-compliance. 

Conditions Where Instance-by-Instance Citations May Apply:

The second memorandum, Exercising Discretion When Not to Group Violations, states that it is “intended to reiterate existing policy that allows Regional Administrators and Area Directors discretion to not group violations in appropriate cases to achieve a deterrent effect.” Instead they should cite them separately, with the goal of effectively encouraging employers to comply with the the OSH Act.

This updated guidance covers enforcement activity in general industry, agriculture, maritime and construction industries, and becomes effective 60 days from Jan. 26, 2023. Since the current policy has been in place for more than 30 years and applies only to egregious willful citations, these aggressive changes make it clear that OSHA is focused on deterring employers from ignoring their responsibilities to keep workers safe.

Doug Parker, Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health explained the changes this way, “Smart, impactful enforcement means using all the tools available to us when an employer ‘doesn’t get it’ and will respond to only additional deterrence in the form of increased citations and penalties. This is intended to be a targeted strategy for those employers who repeatedly choose to put profits before their employees’ safety, health and wellbeing. Employers who callously view injured or sickened workers simply as a cost of doing business will face more serious consequences.”

OSHA has delivered remarkable progress in improving the safety of America’s work force. Workplace injuries, illnesses and fatalities have fallen dramatically over the years. OSHA has tackled fatal safety hazards and health risks by establishing common sense standards and enforcing the law against those who put workers at risk. OSHA standards and enforcement actions have saved thousands of lives and prevented countless injuries and illnesses. Looking to the future, OSHA is renewing its commitment to protecting workers by promoting best practices that can save lives.

Posted on Leave a comment

10th Annual National Safety Stand-Down

The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries. A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees. In addition to the annual event, the U.S. Department of Labor announced that its Occupational Safety and Health Administration has begun a National Emphasis Program to prevent falls, which is the violation cited most frequently in construction industry inspections.

“This national emphasis program aligns all of OSHA’s fall protection resources to combat one of the most preventable and significant causes of workplace fatalities,” said Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Doug Parker. “We’re launching this program in concert with the 10th annual National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction and the industry’s Safety Week. Working together, OSHA and employers in all industries can make lasting changes to improve worker safety and save lives.”

In fact, any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on Fall Hazards. Reinforcing the importance of fall prevention is another way to be proactive in reducing falls. Additionally, employers of companies not exposed to fall hazards, can also use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals.

Past Stand-Down Participants Include:

  • Commercial construction companies of all sizes
  • Residential construction contractors
  • Sub- and independent contractors
  • Highway construction companies
  • General industry employers
  • U.S. Military
  • Unions
  • Employer’s trade associations
  • Institutes
  • Employee interest organizations
  • Safety equipment manufacturers

This event is open to anyone who wants to prevent hazards in the workplace. Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity. For example, discussing job specific hazards, conducting safety equipment inspections, or developing rescue plans. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace.

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Professionals (ASSP), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

OSHA offers some suggestions for a successful Stand-Down which include:

  • Try to start early. 
  • Think about asking others associated with your project to participate in the stand-down.
  • Consider reviewing your fall prevention program.
  • Develop presentations or activities that will meet your needs.
  • Decide when to hold the stand-down and how long it will last.
  • Promote the stand-down.
  • Hold your stand-down.
  • Follow up.

It is important to decide what information will be best for your workplace and employees. The meeting should provide information to employees about hazards, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies, goals and expectations. Hands-on exercises like a worksite walkaround, equipment checks, etc. can increase employee engagement. It is important to make it interesting to employees. Some employers find that serving snacks increases participation. In Addition, make it positive and interactive. Let employees talk about their experiences and encourage them to make suggestions. If you learned something that could improve your fall prevention program, consider making changes. At NSC we offer resources to help with Fall Prevention Training.

Posted on Leave a comment

2023 Penalty Increase for all OSHA Violations

Penalty Increase for 2023 Announced

In addition to OSHA’s heightened focus on enforcement, the U.S. Department of Labor recently announced changes to Occupational Safety and Health Administration civil penalty amounts based on cost-of-living adjustments for 2023. Since 2015, agencies have been required to adjust penalties and make subsequent annual adjustments for inflation. The purpose of increased penalties is to improve the effectiveness and to maintain their deterrent effect.

This year, OSHA’s maximum penalties for serious and other-than-serious violations will increase from $14,502 per violation to $15,625 per violation. The maximum penalty for willful or repeated violations will increase from $145,027 per violation to $156,259 per violation. These increases, in addition to OSHA’s enhanced focus on enforcement, remind employers how critical it is to pay attention to their responsibility to provide a safe workplace for all employees. The ability to cite each individual violation separately could mean significantly higher costs for non compliance.

The best way to avoid workplace safety violations is an ongoing dedication to education and training. Both employers and employees must be aware of all the safety concerns at their workplace and be prepared to address those safety issues. Is your safety education program equipping your workers to keep themselves safe at work? It is helpful to be aware of common workplace hazards as well as the unique hazards specific to your own work environment. Are you aware of the top cited OSHA violations and how to address those?

OSHA’s Top 10 Cited Violations for 2021 & 2022

20222021
 1. Fall ProtectionFall Protection
 2. Hazard CommunicationRespiratory Protection
 3. Respiratory ProtectionLadders
 4. LaddersHazard Communication
 5. ScaffoldingScaffolding
 6. Lockout/TagoutFall Protection Training
 7. Powered Industrial TrucksControl of Hazardous Energy
 8. Fall Protection TrainingEye and Face Protection
 9. Personal Protective and Lifesaving EquipmentPowered Industrial Trucks
10. Machine GuardingMachinery and Machine Guarding

At NSC, our mission is to provide the tools and information businesses need to create safe, efficient and compliant workplaces. Check out all the resources available on our website.

Posted on 1 Comment

U.S. Department of Labor to Hold Meeting of the Construction Advisory Committee Workgroups to Discuss Industry Hazards

MEWP

Click here to read in Spanish

WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor will hold a teleconference meeting of the Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health (ACCSH) Workgroups on Thursday, March 5, 2020.

The Education, Training and Outreach workgroup will meet from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. EST to discuss trench safety and fall prevention. The Emerging and Current Issues workgroup will meet from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. EST to discuss opioids and suicides in construction.

WHAT:          Teleconference Meeting of Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health Workgroups

WHEN:          Thursday, March 5, 2020

  • Education, Training and Outreach workgroup: 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. EST
  • Emerging and Current Issues workgroup: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. EST

WHERE:       Teleconference Dial-in Number 888-658-5408   Passcode 7001480

Attendance will be by teleconference only. For additional information about the telecommunication requirements for the meeting, please contact Veneta Chatmon at (202) 693-2020, or by e-mail at chatmon.veneta@dol.gov.

Comments and requests to speak must be submitted electronically at http://www.regulations.gov, the Federal eRulemaking Portal, by mail or facsimile. Requests and submissions are due by Feb. 28, 2020. Read the Federal Register notice for submission details and telecommunications requirements. The meeting is open to the public.

Established under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act and the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act of 1970, ACCSH advises the Secretary of Labor and Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health on construction standards and policy matters.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers and retirees of the United States; improve working conditions; advance opportunities for profitable employment; and assure work-related benefits and rights.

Posted on Leave a comment

Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards

This past September the top 10 most frequently citedFall Protection Safety Training
workplace safety violations for fiscal year 2019 were released by OSHA. It is common knowledge that the rankings for the top 10 generally do not vary much from year to year. This does not mean the list is irrelevant or unimportant.

Each violation that occurred is a reminder of the hazards employees face on a daily basis when they clock in for work. And each violation that occurred most likely resulted in an injury of some type, maybe even death! The list serves as a reminder there is still work to be done to ensure the safety of all U.S. workers. As you read through the list, let it ignite a desire to expect better and to be proactive where safety is concerned as a company, as an employer, and as an employee.

OSHA’s Top 10 most cited workplace safety violations

Fall Protection (1926.501) leads the list again for the
ninth consecutive year with over 6,000 violations. Moving up a spot is
Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) from number five last year to number four. It
switched places with Respiratory Protection (1910.134) which is down to number
five. Here is the complete list:

  1. Fall Protection – General Requirements (1926.501) with 6,010 violations
  2. Hazard Communication (1910.1200) with 3,671 violations
  3. Scaffolding (1926.451) with 2,813 violations
  4. Lockout / Tagout (1910.147) with 2,606 violations
  5. Respiratory Protection (1910.134) with 2,450 violations
  6. Ladders (1926.1053) with 2,345 violations
  7. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) with 2,093 violations
  8. Fall Protection – Training Requirements (1926.503) with 1,773 violations
  9. Machine Guarding (1910.212) with 1,743 violations
  10. PPE Eye and Face Protection (1926.102) with 1,411 violations

As responsible employers, we must do our best to ensure the safety and health of our employees. Keep these topics in mind as you think through your safety training schedule for 2020. How can you mitigate risks? How can you ensure your employees understand the material?