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MID-YEAR LABOR LAW CHANGES

Keeping up with labor laws can be a daunting task. Changes seem to occur almost daily. And while this isn’t actually the case, it can sure feel that way. Changes to federal labor laws do not happen quite as frequent as those at the state level as a general rule. But in times of uncertainty, as we experienced with Covid in 2020, even federal labor laws can be enacted quickly as we saw with the passing of the CARES Act. The laws created by the CARES Act were of a temporary nature with many of the requirements ending in December of 2020. Most changes to labor laws are not temporary though. We find states often update various laws throughout the year. Some of those changes are considered minor such as address changes, website address changes, or department personnel changes. Other changes are considered major such as increases in minimum wages, newly enacted laws, and major changes to the text of an existing law.

Midyear often brings about many of those changes. The most common change is a state’s Minimum Wage. Although the Federal Minimum Wage has not increased since July 2009, many states, cities, and counties have a higher minimum wage. (Employers are required to pay workers the higher amount.)

The following states have mid-year minimum wage increases:

  • Connecticut: $13/hr. effective August 1, 2021
  • District of Columbia: $15.20/hr. effective July 1, 2021
  • Florida: $10/hr. effective September 30, 2021
  • Nevada: Minimum Wage and Daily Overtime Bulletin
    • For Employees offering qualified health insurance benefits: $8.75/hr. effective July 1, 2021. The daily overtime wage will increase to $13.125 per hour.
    • For Employers that do not offer qualified health insurance benefits: $9.75/hr. effective July 1, 2021. The daily overtime wage will increase to $14.625 per hour.

Additional changes to many state laws have also taken place and include:

California:

  • Safety and Health Protection on the Job: Address change

Florida:

  • Workers’ Comp Works for You: website change for reporting suspected insurance fraud online.

Illinois:

  • Your Rights Under Illinois Employment Laws: address change
  • Victims’ Economic Security and Safety Act: added victims of gender violence to protected groups.

Louisiana:

  • Earned Income Credit: 2021 income limits for earned income tax credit updated.

Missouri:

  • Fair Employment: Statutory purpose updated.

Oregon:

  • Paid Sick Time: Clarifies that paid sick time also covers bereavement, parental leave and leave to care for a child whose school is closed for a public health emergency.
  • Family Leave Act: Allows leave to take care for a child whose school is closed for public health emergency.
  • Equal Pay Act: Illegal for an employer to pay an employee less than someone else based on pay history.

Virginia: Email and phone number changes

  • Virginia Human Rights Act
  • Low Income Credit

To keep up with the most current changes to the federal labor laws as well as your state labor laws you can sign up for a free email update service. Simply click here to enroll: https://www.nsccompliance.net/llp-updates/

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New Year – New Labor Laws

Recently, we wrote about the most current minimum wage changes that took place this year. As of January 13, there have been 26 minimum wage changes across the U.S. Today, we will discuss some of the newest labor law changes that could affect your business. With these changes come changes to the required postings. To see a list of all the changes on a state-by-state basis visit Most Recent Labor Law Changes. In this article we will discuss just a few of the updates. You can sign-up to receive email updates regarding labor law changes and the accompanying required posting(s) on our Labor Law Poster Update Notifications page. Click on your state and enter your email address just above the subscribe button.

Many people have inquired about the Federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act that required certain employers to provide their employees with paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave for specific reasons related to COVID-19. That posting was effective only thru December 31, 2021.  As of this writing, there has not been an extension to that law. (https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd). Stay connected and we will keep you up to date of any new changes that may take affect.

Here is a summary of just a few of the state changes:

California: Senate Bill 1383 (Family Care & Medical Leave & Pregnancy Disability Leave; Your Rights and Obligations as a Pregnant Employee, Workplace Discrimination, Notice to Employees Paid Family Leave) (https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200SB1383)

Effective January 1, 2021, this bill expands the California Family Rights Act to include employers with 5 or more employees. It also expands the list of reasons for taking family or medical leave and includes taking leave to bond with a new child of the employee or to care for themselves or a child, parent, grandparent, grandchild, sibling, spouse, or domestic partner, as specified. It requires an employer who employs both parents of a child to grant leave to each employee and make it an unlawful employment practice for any employer to refuse to grant a request by an employee to take up to 12 work-weeks of unpaid protected leave during any 12-month period due to a qualifying exigency related to the covered active duty or call to covered active duty of an employee’s spouse, domestic partner, child, or parent in the Armed Forces of the United States.

Colorado: Healthy Families & Workplace Act (Colorado Workplace Public Health Rights Poster: Paid Leave, Whistleblowing & Protective Equipment)

Effective January 1, 2021, Colorado employers with more than 16 employees must provide one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours of work, up to a minimum of 48 hours. On the same posting, the Public Health Emergency Whistleblower Law (PHEW) details workers right to oppose Workplace Health/Safety violations during public health emergencies and gives workers’ rights to use their own Personal Protective Equipment. 

Florida: Human Trafficking Bill, Chapter 2019-152, Laws of Florida (Human Trafficking posting)

Healthcare professionals licensed by the following Boards: Acupuncture, Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, Chiropractic Medicine, Podiatric Medicine, Optometry, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Nursing Home Administration, Occupational Therapy, Dietetics and Nutrition, Respiratory Care, Massage Therapy, and Physical Therapy must complete one hour of continuing education (CE) on human trafficking and post a sign about human trafficking in their office by January 1, 2021.

Maine: Earned Paid Employee Leave Law (Regulation of Employment)

An employer that employs more than 10 employees in the usual and regular course of business for more than 120 days in any calendar year shall permit each employee to earn paid leave based on the employee’s base pay. An employee is entitled to earn one hour of paid leave from a single employer for every 40 hours worked, up to 40 hours in one year of employment. Accrual of leave begins at the start of employment, but the employer is not required to permit use of the leave before the employee has been employed by that employer for 120 days during a one-year period.

Massachusetts: Paid Family and Medical Leave (Notice of Benefits)

On January 1, 2021, the Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave Act (PFML) will begin providing benefits to eligible workers for qualifying reasons. Covered individuals may be entitled to up to 20 weeks of paid medical leave in a benefit year if they have a serious health condition that incapacitates them from work. They may be entitled to up to 12 weeks of paid family leave in a benefit year related to the birth, adoption, or foster care placement of a child, or because of a qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that a family member is on active duty or has been notified of an impending call to active duty in the Armed Forces. Covered individuals may be entitled to up to 26 weeks of paid family leave in a benefit year to care for a family member who is a covered service member with a serious health condition.

Oregon: OAR 437-001-0744 (Oregon OSHA’s COVID-19 Temporary Standard for All Workplaces)

Oregon has released a Temporary COVID-19 Rule for all workplaces that is effective through May 4, 2021 unless it is revised or repealed before that date. The requirements include physical distancing, facial coverings, , workplace risk assessments and other pertinent information regarding notifying your employer and your right to notify your employer or Oregon OSHA about workplace hazards.

These are just a few of the state changes. State labor laws change throughout the year and no two states have the same requirements. It is important and (required by law) that employees are made aware of these various laws, bills, and acts. Employers must post the postings in their place of business where everyone has access to them and if there are remote workers, making them accessible to view online or by email. Labor law and the required workplace notices is an important issue and should not be ignored by any business.

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Changes to Expect for Labor Law Posters in 2021

Learning about Labor Laws

Remember when the big story last year in labor law was increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour? While that is still an issue being discussed, as we get closer to 2021, one of the most asked business questions now is what changes will be required due to COVID-19? This pandemic has impacted businesses all over the world, not only in the way we work but also in what laws/regulations or protocols businesses must have in place.

Sign up here to stay updated on changes in Labor Law required postings in your state.

Safety Protocols

While there are no standards currently written specifically for COVID-19, OSHA has outlined that certain regulations could be used to help prevent the spread of the virus. These standards include Bloodborne Pathogens, Personal Protective Equipment, Respiratory Protection, and the General Duty Clause.  To reduce the impact of pandemics such as COVID-19 on businesses, workers, customers, and the public, it is vital to prepare and to plan. Measures for protecting workers from exposure and infection depend on the type of work being performed and exposure risk, including potential for interaction with people with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 and contamination of the work environment. The pandemic will continue to have an impact on the workplace and laws relating to employees. You can find more detailed information here.

If you would like to stay proactive, consider training your employees on infectious disease control.

Labor Law Changes

Employees and employers have a lot of questions concerning The Family and Medical Leave Act as it relates to the Covid-19 pandemic. Can paid sick leave or time off be used for reasons related to COVID-19: symptoms, quarantine, caring for someone who is in quarantine and school closures and who is considered a family member? The Families First Coronavirus Response Act was signed on March 18, 2020 and went into effect April 1, 2020It expanded the FMLA and addressed some of those questions but is set to terminate on December 31st of 2020. Now everyone is waiting and watching to see what the Federal Gov’t will do to address these concerns past December 31st.

The three main areas we expect some type of new or extended legislation to cover are:

  • Paid sick leave: a benefit that allows employees paid time off from work, to stay home to address health issues without losing pay. In some instances, it can be used to care for a child or family member.
  • Family leave: is unpaid, job protected leave for specified family and medical reasons. It also requires that an employee can maintain their group health benefits during the leave.
  • Paid time off: time off when the employee is unable to work because the employee is quarantined and/or experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and seeking a medical diagnosis.

Several states (Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington as of this writing) along with the District of Columbia have implemented or have pending laws and/or regulations that extend or amend the federal law.

What Do I Need to Do?

The Coronavirus is ever-changing and filled with many unknowns which brings new and changing laws and regulations almost every week. It is the employer’s responsibility to be informed and take the necessary steps to ensure a safe workplace. In 2020 many employers had to lay off employees or shut down or scale back businesses. As businesses open back up and get back to work in 2021, employers will have to be prepared and ready by staying informed, implementing necessary precautions and enacting the possible new laws and regulations.  

National Safety Compliance is committed to keeping you up to date on the most recent federal and state changes and posting requirements for your business. The information contained in this blog cannot be considered as legal advice. It is provided for general information only. Contact the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) or your state’s Labor Department or agency for legal advice.

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Employers Must Update Labor Law Posters for 2021

Fair Labor Standards Act

It is hard to believe that we are in the last quarter of 2020. Doesn’t it feel like this year will ever end? As we move towards November and December, we are gearing up for possible updates and changes to the different labor law posters. Now is the time that states begin to release new and/or revised required labor laws postings for the new year. While we are unsure what changes to expect, we do know 2020 brought about several changes in the Labor Law industry and required postings.


One major posting that comes to mind is the Families First Coronavirus Response Act or FFCRA. It took effect on April 1, 2020 and runs through December 31, 2020. On September 11, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division announced revisions to the regulations. While these regulations are set to expire at the end of the year, we anticipate a continuation of some form of the regulations to be extended to run through 2021. With the presidential election looming, along with various Senate and House seats up for grabs, it is anybody’s guess on what will eventually happen. Just know we are monitoring all the states to ensure we have the most recent and up-to-date required postings on our labor law posters.

What are Labor Law Notices? Do they affect my business (Yes, they do!)


Labor laws give structure to the workplace and defines the responsibility of the employer and employee. They are designed to protect the safety and health of workers in America. These postings are mandated notices that employers with at least one employee or more are required to conspicuously post in an area frequented by all employees. Some notices provide information for employees on who to contact for questions concerning discrimination, harassment, or workplace safety complaints. Not all employers are covered by each of the federal or state statutes and thus may not be required to post a specific notice. Every posting varies according to the statute and may not be required to be posted by every business.

The US Department of Labor (DOL) administers a variety of Federal labor laws such as:

  • Fair Labor Standards Act (Federal Minimum Wage)
  • Equal Employment Opportunity
  • Job Safety and Health
  • Your Rights Under USERRA

State Legislations and state agencies also pass certain laws or regulations, that require a posting to be placed in the workplace.

These postings vary from state to state. No two states are the same. Some topics covered by state labor laws include:

  • Child Labor Laws
  • Unemployment Laws
  • Workers’ Compensation Notice
  • State OSHA postings
  • Discrimination
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Minimum Wage

Federal or State Labor Law Posters. Am I Required to Post Both? (Yes, you are!)

A federal law applies to all 50 states and state laws apply only to that state. When federal and state standards are different, the rules that provide the most protection will apply. A state law can give more rights than the federal law and, in that case, the state law generally prevails. For example, the Federal Minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. Many states have approved legislation that sets the state’s minimum wage higher. Employers must comply with both federal law and applicable state laws. Every state and federal agency has its own requirements as to who is required to post their notice, what information must be posted, where it is to be posted and, in some cases, even require a certain size posting.

What Are The Possible Penalties for Not Having Proper Labor Law Postings? (Be Informed, Be Prepared!)

Although there are no standard procedures for businesses to be inspected as to whether they have the right postings or not, there are penalties and/or citations that can be assessed by the different agencies, when a business is found negligent in this area. If an employer were fined by each individual agency, the fines could total over $32,000 per location.

By posting the required postings, you let your managers and workers know that you as an employer will protect your employees from discrimination, harassment, and injury.

Sign up today to get automated updates about changes in labor law postings in your state.

If you have any questions about labor law posters, safety training programs, or any other related issues, please don’t hesitate to reach out. You can contact us by commenting below, using the chat function on our site, e-mailing us at sales@nscemail.com or call us at 877-922-7233

National Safety Compliance is committed to keeping you up to date on the most recent federal and state changes and posting requirements for your business. The information contained in this blog cannot be considered as legal advice. It is provided for general information only. Contact the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) or your state’s Labor Department or agency for legal advice.

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Labor Law Posters & COVID-19

Labor Law Poster Update for COVID-19The Federal Government is taking unprecedented measures to provide financial help to businesses affected by the Covid-19 virus. At this point it appears that almost every business is being affected. Here at National Safety Compliance we find ourselves is uncharted territory as well. Due to a 30-day Shelter-In-Place order and a sharp decline in daily sales, we have reduced our working staff to the bare minimum. Therefore, some of our normal production activities have been put on hold. As a result of this, we are not currently able to update our labor law posters to reflect the changes being made to the federal posting requirements.

A new federal poster has been released called “The Families First Coronavirus Response Act Poster.” This poster provides information regarding employee rights concerning Paid Sick Leave and Expanded Family and Medical Leave Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. The poster takes effect April 1, 2020 and goes through December 31, 2020. Since we cannot at this time update our poster, we have attached a pdf file of the poster for you to print and display along with your current Labor Law poster. It is an 8.5” x 11” size posting which means you do not need special sized paper to print it. Once this emergency situation has passed and we are able to get back to work, we will update our posters and provide those of you on our poster protection plan with a new poster. We apologize for the inconvenience and hope that you understand.

If you have any other training needs, please note that we are still shipping all of our other products. If some of your employees are currently remote, we also have online training programs that you can send directly to them to complete on online from anywhere.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions. We will be happy to assist you as best we can. Stay safe, wash your hands, and hold on tight to hope.

FFCRA Poster for Federal Employees

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act Poster Federal

The Families First Coronavirus Resonse Act Poster Federal (Spanish)

FFCRA Poster for Non-Federal Employees

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act Poster Non-Federal

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act Poster Non-Federal (Spanish)

Need updated Labor Law Posters? Click here to see our poster options.